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Archive for the ‘Reggae Sumfest’ Category

New CD from Versatyle “Ghetto Soldier” is out Get It Now Via Bit Torrent!!!

Posted by Dresonic on May 11, 2008

Front Cover Ghetto Soldier AlbumBack Cover Ghetto Soldier Cd

Ghetto Soldier is Versatyle’s newest creation. The Album features hit singles such as “Crazy feat Price & Jiggy”- “African Princess” – “High Grade” – “Ghetto Soldaz” – “I Miss You feat. Japanese sensation RuRu” and many more. The Album has twenty tracks. Get it while you can freely Via bittorent. Versatyle is making his CD exclusively available to Dresonic.wordpress.com so sonic readers grab it. Dresonic is working on a direct download but still no success with that yet.

Dresonic hopes to get an exclusive interview with Versatyle we will have that up as soon as possible for the sonic readers. Give some feed back…

How To Get It: Follow link and download the torrent file (Versatyle Ghetto_Soldier_Album + Bonus Photos) and then use your favorite bittorent client Utorrent ( get it at Utorrent.com) and then you are down.

About Versatyle : Verastyle is a new upcoming Independent Jamaican Artiste making his way throught the music with his unique flavor appealing to many different people across the world. His Versatility is shown in his songs. This CD was totally written by Versatyle base on his life’s experiences.

Contact Versatyle : myspace.com/therealversatyle

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Posted in Caribbean, Dancehall, Entertainment, Hip Hop, International, Jamaica, Lifestyle, Love, Marijuana, Montego Bay, Music, Music Video, News, Poems, Reggae, Reggae Sumfest, St. Elizabeth, Stephen Marley, The Web, Twins of Twins, Uncategorized, Western Jamaica, Youths | Tagged: | 1 Comment »

New Hit Single from Rugu Nation – Versatyle & Price

Posted by Dresonic on April 21, 2008

Posted in Bob Marley, Bounty Killa, Caribbean, Damian Marley, Dance, Dancehall, Download, Downloads, Entertainment, Food, Hip Hop, International, Jamaica, Lifestyle, Montego Bay, Music, News, Reggae, Reggae Boyz, Reggae Sumfest, Social, St. Elizabeth, Stephen Marley, Technology, Uncategorized, Videos, Western Jamaica, Youths | Comments Off on New Hit Single from Rugu Nation – Versatyle & Price

Beenie entertained, Cham was truly brilliant

Posted by Dresonic on July 23, 2007

Red Stripe Reggae Sumfest’s Dancehall Night on Thursday attracted the largest audience since its 15-year inception – perhaps an indication that dancehall is not entirely dead but has merely evolved, becoming more mainstream.

Cham gets into his act. (Photos: Joseph Wellington)

“We cannot fight dancehall,” said MC Richard ‘Richie B’ Burgess, “it’s relevant. It’s gonna be around a long time to come,” he added, noting that show organisers had declared the gathering “the largest crowd in the festival’s 15-year run”.

The at least 20,000-strong throng consisted of both Jamaican and international dancehall aficionados who went to the Catherine Hall venue to see their favourite acts at the height of their game. And what a game it was since several top acts managed to thoroughly entertain even as they indicted the island’s politicians and lobbied for peace during the weeks leading up to elections.

Ever the consummate performer, top act Beenie Man, proved to Jamaica, once again, why he was worthy of his self-professed title ‘King of the Dancehall’. Donned in his trademark trench and matching black, green and gold suit, Beenie was a picture of patriotic perfection, rendering hit after hit punctuated by his political opinions.

“All who bun dutty JLP and dutty PNP put up oonu hand,” the deejay said, the audience readily and unanimously responding. The audience showed their appreciation for the artiste’s comment with mock gun salutes, raised lighters and blow torches even as he continued to speak of the nation’s leaders. The artiste, who was the last act for the morning, exited with his latest hit Back It Up.

But if Beenie Man is ‘King of the Dancehall’, then, judging from crowd response, Mavado must be its prince.
The turbulent, vocally gripping character that is Mavado entered the stage on the brink of daybreak to celebratory screams and fireworks. Seeming totally at ease, he delivered with precision his brutally chilling discourse Weh Dem A Say, Gangsta for Life and Badman Place, et al. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Jamaica, Music, Reggae Sumfest | 1 Comment »

Deejays plead for peaceful election

Posted by Dresonic on July 23, 2007

Montego Bay, St James – Dancehall heavyweights used their musical platform at the just concluded Red Stripe Reggae Sumfest to appeal for a peaceful election, putting to rest fears by the local police that utterances by the artistes would have stirred political tension.

Chuck Fender. led the way in calling for a peaceful election.

“It’s quite refreshing to see them taking that stance,” said St James commanding officer Superintendent Steve McGregor, who warned last week that any such utterances would have been dealt with sternly. “You could see that they were really making an effort and it augurs well for Reggae, which is an integral part of our culture.”

Prior to the start of the four-day festival, McGregor said he had met with Sumfest organisers and warned that inflammatory political utterances by artistes would not be tolerated.
In response, chairman of Summerfest Productions, Robert Russell, pledged to support the police in ensuring that the artistes refrained from negative political statements, but noted that it was unusual for them to get involved in politics in any negative way.

True to form, several artistes made good on this and on Thursday, as Reggae music exploded on the Catherine Hall stage, Chuck Fender led the way in calling for a peaceful election, set for August 27, 2007.
Several others of the genre’s leading lights followed suit, including the hard-hitting Anthony B.
“Mi a beg oonu, duh, nuh kill off none a yuh bredda dem dis election,” he pleaded.

Deejay Cham, who lashes out against vicious criminals in his latest single Conscience, also spoke out against election violence. “Election a come, please, mi a beg oonu, it a affect the yout dem, it a affect old people,” he said.

Deejays Idonia and Assassin also added their pleas, while dancehall’s arch rivals Beenie Man and Bounty Killer found common ground on the issue. “All who bun dutty JLP and dutty PNP put up oonu hand,” Beenie Man instructed during his closing set Friday morning, while Bounty declared, “mi nuh waah hear who say dem a go do dis and do dat, mi waah hear when minimum wage a go rise and how dem a go help poor people”.

And in what was the only broadside directed at any one party Ninja Man, the dancehall’s ‘Don Gorgon’, scolded, “dem have whole holiday fi run dem dutty election and a wait til di pickni dem fi go back a school”.

Posted in International, Jamaica, Lifestyle, Music, Reggae, Reggae Sumfest, Western Jamaica | Comments Off on Deejays plead for peaceful election

US singer gives emotion-filled performance at Sumfest

Posted by Dresonic on July 23, 2007

Mary J Blige is one of those performers who, through music, relates her own experiences, moving the most stoic of listeners to catharsis. “I was going through hell, and when you went out and bought my album, I was your therapist. and when you listened we both began to heal,” said the emotional singer during her Saturday night performance at Red Stripe Reggae Sumfest’s final instalment, The Zenith.

Blue lights flashed as the thud of piano keys heralded the favourite No More Drama, which alludes to her past struggles with abusive relationships and an alleged drug problem.
The life lessons continued, as the diva’s voice soared, meandering through difficult rifts even as she contorted her slim frame as if each word jabbed her body.

 

“Don’t let the naysayers kill your dreams. keep kickin’ ’em to the curve. Be happy with who you are,” the R&B queen declared, her fans endorsing her statement by way of applause. And after a long sigh, she proceeded with the love song Be Without You from her late 2005 album Breakthrough.

“I got sick and tired of people’s opinions and how I let that rule my life. as long as I love who I am that’s cool,” she said, apt lines for the introduction to Take Me As I Am, followed by the bluesy I’m Going Down. The audience, however, seemed to have ‘first dibs’ on the latter track, nearly completing the song before the singer could utter a note.
The ghetto soprano’s four-inch heels proved no impediment for her since she glided across the stage, dancing, stooping and jumping during the other renditions: Real Love (her 1994 debut single), Enough Cryin’ – produced by famous R&B producer Rodney ‘Dark Child’ Jerkins, featuring her rapping alter ego Brooklyn – and Baggage, among others.

Showcasing her impressive repertoire aside, Blige was the consummate performer, possessing what seemed like an innate ability to connect with her mostly female fan base – many of whom were also stirred to emotion. Her set was well-organised and perfectly executed, which easily made her the best performer of the three-day festival.
The singer, who appeared midway through the show, closed with her ‘crunk’ track Dance For Me.

It seemed emotion – albeit of a different and perhaps a more tongue-in-cheek variety – was also on homegrown star Tanya Stephens’ agenda. Her trademark ‘sunglasses-at-night’ paired with jeans, furry boots and a simple tank made for a simple appearance, but this lyrical maven’s songs were anything but. In fact, the whole arrangement was quite complex, one that could sit in any of the world’s major music festivals.

Taurus Riley is at ease with his guitar during his performance on Saturday night at Reggae Sumfest.

Releasing hit after enthralling hit, the rebel reggae-rocker sang It’s A Pity and Way Back, the track that served as a segue into her older material like Nuh Ready Fi Dis Yet, Don’t Goggle and Handle The Ride. The musical time machine was fast forward to present day when she performed the sexually charged Boom Wuk, Good Ride and Tek Him Back, all from her penultimate project Gangsta Blues. The artiste, who weeks prior to Sumfest declared in a Splash interview that “the other woman” is often her muse, didn’t disappoint with bitter-break-up-songs After You, Damn You and Can’t Live Without Me.

The biggest applause, however, came for the artiste’s latest single These Streets from her 2006 Rebelution album.
Tessanne Chin, who was among the smaller acts to grace the Sumfest stage, also showed brilliantly with her rock-meets-reggae vocals, especially on tracks like Black Books, One Night Stand and the tres popular Hideaway.

Though the ladies gave the strongest showing, reggae-rock steady crooners Beres Hammond and newcomer Taurus Riley were simply refreshing – especially the latter, whose raspy, breezy lilt resounded through the Catherine Hall venue.
Think John Legend’s rough-cut tremolos paired with the lyrical poignancy of Bob Marley to understand the genius that local music lovers know as Taurus Riley.

Performing choice tracks from his 2006 album Parables, including Microchip, Lion Paw and a cover of John Legend’s Stay With You, the singer soared. It was his closer, the ‘rootsy’ reggae ballad She’s Royal, that sent screams through the audience and the singer had to pause his rendition due to the loud noise.

Veteran balladeer Beres Hammond gave an inspiring performance, charming with his hits and making an impromptu call for audience member Beenie Man to join him on stage. The deejay obliged and the results were simply entertaining.
This reporter left the venue during the tribute to veteran musicians Lloyd Parks and his We The People band.

Posted in International, Jamaica, Montego Bay, Music, Reggae, Reggae Sumfest | Comments Off on US singer gives emotion-filled performance at Sumfest